The best artworks to collect are often riddles. While they immediately hit you on an emotional level, they might take a lifetime to navigate thoroughly. Some of their layers might be unexpected even to the artist who created them. Eddy Susanto’s work belongs to this category. Perhaps it might appear too intellectual for some. The Indonesian will be required to look back at forgotten Javanese mythology and history. The European will be asked to grasp notions buried in the depths of half-remembered literature classes. Even a professor of comparative studies would be challenged in understanding the references to worldviews from opposite corners of the planet. And yet history is not enough. The viewer must be very aware of modern challenges posed by technology, science and the market. Basically, to fully understand Eddy Susanto’s work, you are required to be Eddy Susanto. Of course, 99.999999986% of us are not Eddy Susanto. So how ...

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CARLA BIANPOEN - THE JAKARTA POST The phenomenon of the Javanese script on the canvases of Eddy Susanto has been a tool for unifying cultures from the farthest corners of the eastern and western hemispheres. Such is again reinforced in his work for the Tokyo Art Fair, which was held from March 17-19. Infusing the Japanese story of Genji with that of the Javanese saga of Panji, Eddy Susanto fused the identical characters into one by using the narrative of Panji in Javanese script to shape the Genji figures on canvas. A history and literature freak, Eddy found that the Panji story from his native Java has features similar to the Japanese Genji story. Although he found it intriguing that both sagas narrate identical lives of pleasure, love, life and adventure, he insisted the tales go beyond love stories — they involve heroic incidents and elements of ethical value. Panji was a legendary prince ...

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